Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheets

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file icon Stachytarpheta jamaicensishot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 620
VERBENA FAMILY
Verbenaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: blue porter weed, blue snake weed, Brazilian tea, Jamaica snakeweed, porterweed, snake weed
Indonesia: gewongan, jarong
Malaysia: ramput tahi babi, selaseh dandi
Philippines: albaka, bilu-bilu, bolomaros, kandi-kandilaan, limbagat, sentemiento, verbena de las antilles
Viet Nam: cây duôi chuot, hai tiên
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen shrubby herb (60–120 cm high), young stems green or purplish, mostly hairless and square in cross-section becoming rounded, light brown and woody as they mature; woody rootstock.
Leaves: Green with a bluish or greyish tinge, leathery, hairless or with a few hairs on veins on undersides, simple, leaves eggshaped, oval or somewhat elongated with almost parallel sides (2–12 cm long and 1–5 cm wide) with rounded tips, margins sharp but finely toothed; leaves held opposite each other on stems on stalks 5–35 mm long.
Flowers: Light blue, blue or mauve, tubular (7–11 mm long and 8 mm across) on long, curved and thick spikes (15–50 cm long and 3–7 mm thick) at the end of branches.
Fruits: Capsules (dry fruits that open at maturity), green turning dark brown, dark purple or black as they mature, small, somewhat elongated with almost parallel sides (3–7 mm longand 1.5–2 mm across).
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname, south-eastern USA, Venezuela, and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed sites, wastelands, fallow land, plantations, managed pasture, gardens, drainage ditches, savannah, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps, lowlands, floodplains and coastal environs.
 
IMPACTS
Forms dense stands outcompeting native plants for water and nutrients. Probable host of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus in India (Mathew and Balakrishnan, 1991).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Sphagneticola trilobatahot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 527
DAISY FAMILY
Asteraceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: creeping oxeye, creeping daisy, creeping wedelia, Singapore daisy
Indonesia: seruni, widelia, wedelia
Malaysia: panchut-panchut
Philippines: imelda
Viet Nam: son cúc ba thùy
 
DESCRIPTION
Creeping, mat-forming evergreen herb with scrambling or climbing habit [15–30 (–70) cm tall]; stems green or reddish (up to 2 m long), slightly hairy, rounded, rooting at the joints.
Leaves: Dark green, glossy, almost hairless, simple, fleshy (40–180 mm long and 15–80 mm wide), three-lobed, margins toothed, held in opposite pairs on stem, stalkless or on short stalks.
Flowers: Bright yellow to orange, daisy-like (20–35 mm across), borne singly on upright stalks (3–15 cm long).
Fruits: Achene (small, dry, one-seeded fruit that does not open at maturity), brown, elongate (4–5 mm long).
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine, erosion control and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed areas, wasteland, drainage ditches, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps and lowlands.
 
IMPACTS
Forms a dense ground cover to the detriment of other plant species. It is also allelopathic enhancing its competitiveness (Zhang et al., 2004). Even low infestation levels have a negative impact on plant diversity. In a study on Hainan Island, China, S. trilobata already starts decreasing plant community diversity at 10% cover (Qi et al., 2014). In south-east Viti Levu and Taveuni Island, Fiji, it has invaded taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott; Araceae] fields (Macanawai, 2013).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Solanum viarumhot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 433
TOMATO FAMILY
Solanaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: tropical soda apple
Viet Nam: cà trái vàng
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen, erect herb [50–150 (–200) cm tall], with densely hairy stems and branches with recurved (2–5 mm long) and straight spines (up to 20 mm long) on the leaf stalks and the leaf veins.
Leaves: Dark green, glossy above, duller below, hairy, simple, broadly egg-shaped [6–20 cm long and 6–15 cm wide], bluntly lobed, with spines on the veins and hairs on both sides, leaf stalks are 3–7 cm long with prickles. Flowers: White (1.5 cm across), in clusters of 1–5.
Fruits: Berries (fleshy fruits that don’t open at maturity), mottled light and dark green becoming pale yellow as they mature, smooth (2–3 cm across), containing 400 brown seeds (2–3 mm in diameter).
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, southern Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and accidentally as a contaminant.
 
INVADES
Grassland, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
Dense stands displace other plant species by crowding or shading them out. The prickles on the plants reduce wildlife forage and prevent movement of animals through invaded areas (USDA-FS, 2005). The foliage and stems are unpalatable to cattle, considerably reducing livestock-carrying capacities (Medal et al., 2012). Control costs of S. viarum to ranchers in Florida were estimated at US$ 6.5–16 million per year (Thomas, 2007). It has also caused poisoning of goats in Florida (Porter et al., 2003). It is an alternative host for many plant diseases including the cucumber mosaic virus, gemini virus, potato leafroll virus, potato virus Y, tobacco etch virus, tomato mosaic virus, tomato mottle virus and the fungal pathogen, Alternaria solani (Cooke, 1997). It is also a host for a number of insect pests (Sudbrink et al., 2000; Medal et al., 2012).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Senna occidentalishot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 461
PEA FAMILY
Fabaceae; subfamily: Caesalpiniaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: ant bush, arsenic bush, coffee senna, sicklepod, stinkweed.
 
DESCRIPTION
Annual or lives for more than one year but less that two, erect herb or shrub (0.5–2.5 m tall); stems reddish-purple, smooth, hairless or sparsely hairy, four-angled or grooved when young becoming greenish-brown and rounded.
Leaves: Green, once-divided (15–20 cm long), with 3–5 pairs of oppositely held egg-shaped or oval leaflets (3–10 cm long and 2–3 cm wide) with broad and rounded bases, tapering towards the end with pointed tips; conspicuous gland at the base of each leaf stalk; alternately held on stems on reddish stalks (3–5 cm long).
Flowers: Bright yellow (20–30 mm across) in small clusters of 2–6 flowers in forks of uppermost leaves.
Fruits: Pods (several-seeded dry fruits that split open at maturity), green turning brown as they mature, flattened, slightly curled (75–130 mm long and 8–10 mm wide), held upright.
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Cayman Islands, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Coffee substitute, medicine and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, wasteland, disturbed land, fallow land, managed pastures, drainage ditches, woodland edges/gaps, savannah, riparian vegetation and gullies.
 
IMPACTS
Dense stands can displace native plant species, and reduce livestock carrying capacities in managed and natural pastures. Being allelopathic, it inhibits the germination and growth of other plants. Studies have shown that it has a negative impact on maize (Arora, 2013) and cotton yields (Higgins et al., 1986), and is an alternative host for crop diseases (Suteri et al., 1979). The seeds of S. occidentalis are highly toxic, containing compounds that damage the liver, the vascular system and the heart and lungs of domestic livestock, often leading to death in cattle (Barros et al., 1999), horses (Riet-Correa et al., 1998), goats (Suliman et al., 1982; Suliman and Shommein, 1986), pigs (Martins et al., 1986), poultry (Haraguchi et al., 1998), and rabbits (O’Hara and Pierce, 1974). Consumption of the seeds in western Uttar Pradesh, in India, resulted in the deaths of nine children within five days (Vashishtha et al., 2007).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Ruellia tuberosahot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 436
ACANTHUS FAMILY
Acanthaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: bluebell, iron root, large bell-flower, minnieroot, popping pod, ruellia, sheep potato, spearpod
Cambodia: phka arch kok, phka smau, smau leach phtoush
Indonesia: pletekan
Viet Nam: cây Qua no
 
DESCRIPTION
Biennial (lives for 1–2 years) herb, creeping or upright [60 (–70) cm tall], stems four-sided and hairy, swollen and purplish at the nodes with thick, elongated spindle-shaped tuberous roots. Leaves: Green, glossy, almost hairless, simple, oval to eggshaped [5–9 (–18) cm long and 2–4 (–9) cm wide], margins entire, leaf stalk is 5–7 mm long.
Flowers: Mauve to blue-violet, solitary, tubular (5–5.5 cm long and 3.5 cm across), showy.
Fruits: Capsule, hairless, elongated with almost parallel sides (2.2–3 cm long), containing 24–28 seeds.
 
ORIGIN
Colombia, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, railway lines, disturbed land, drainage ditches and lowlands.
 
IMPACTS
Forms dense stands displacing native plants and the organisms associated with them.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
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