Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheets

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file icon Musculista senhousiahot!Tooltip 09/13/2019 Hits: 241
SYSTEM
Marine
 
COMMON NAMES
English: Asian mussel, green mussel, cuckoo mussel, senhouse mussel, hototogisu, Senhouse's mussel, Asian date mussel, Japanese mussel, green bagmussel, date mussel
 
DESCRIPTION
Musculista senhousia is a small mussel with a maximum length of around 30mm, but most commonly 10-25mm in length and up to 12mm in width. It has a smooth, thin shell which is an olive green to brown in colour, with dark radial lines or zigzag markings. A well developed byssus is used to construct a cocoon which protects the shell. This cocoon is made up of byssal threads and sediment. M. senhousia burrows vertically down into the sand/mud leaving only its posterior end protruding, allowing its siphons access to the water to enable feeding (NIMPIS, 2002; CIESM, 2005).
 
NATIVE RANGE
ASEAN: Singapore
World: Japan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation
 
KNOWN INTRODUCED RANGE
ASEAN:
WORLD: Australia, China, France, Italy, Mediterranean and Black Sea, New Zealand, Tanzania Republic Of, Canada, Egypt, Israel, Madagascar, Mexico, Slovenia, United States
 
PATHWAY
Transport – Ship/boat ballast water 
Aquaculture
Trading
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Musculista senhousia may have been introduced to Australia as an accidental importation with Pacific oysters (CSIRO, 2000). In the Mediterranean, invasion of M. senhousia has been strictly linked with shellfish arming and trading.The initial invasion of the Pacific coast of the USA is attributed to transport with oysters imported from Japan (Mistri et al. 2004).
 
IMPACTS
Musculista senhousia can dominate benthic communities and potentially exclude native species. It settles in aggregations and is therefore able to reach high densities. Unlike most mussels, M.senhousia lives entirely within the sediments, surrounded by a bag of byssal threads. At mussel densities of greater than 1500 m2, individual byssal bags coalesce to form a continuous mat or carpet on the sediment surface. The presence of these mats dramatically alters the natural benthic habitat, changing both the local physical environment and the resident macroinvertebrate assemblage. M. senhousia deposits large amounts of organic matter in the sediment, which possibly results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites such as sulfide, which can have adverse effects on seagrass growth (Morton, 1974; Ito and Kajihara, 1981; in Reusch and Williams, 1998).
 
Source: Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) 2015. Species profile Musculista senhousia. Available from: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1031 [Accessed 09 September 2019]
file icon Gymnodinium catenatumhot!Tooltip 09/13/2019 Hits: 232
SYSTEM
Marine
 
COMMON NAMES
English: naked dinoflagellate, estuarine dinoflagellate, chain-forming dinoflagellate
 
DESCRIPTION
Gymnodinium catenatum is a toxic, bloom forming species of microalgae. It is usually seen in long, swimming chains of tiny cells, with up to 32 cells in a chain (occasionally 64). It is also seen as solitary cells with a green-brown colour. The size of these cells ranges from 38 - 53 um long and 33 - 45 um wide. The cells are circular to squarish in shape, with many rounded organelles within them. Cysts of G. catenatum are brown, spherical and range in size from 45 - 50 um in diameter.
 
KNOWN INTRODUCED RANGE
ASEAN: Philippines, Singapore
WORLD: Argentina, Baha De La Paz, China, Cuba, Iberian Coastal, Japan, Korea, Republic Of, Mexico, Pacific-Eastern Central, Portugal, Spain, Venezuela, Australia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Italy, Korea Democratic People’s Republic Of, Mediterranean and Black Sea, New Zealand, Uruguay
 
PATHWAY
Transport – Ship/boat Ballast Water
Aquaculture and Fisheries
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Ballast water can transport this organism long distances to new environments. Cysts of G. catenatum can be accidentally translocated through aquaculture and fisheries activities, such as in oyster cages or on mussel ropes.
 
IMPACTS
Toxins (saxitoxins and gonyautoxins) produced by Gymnodinium catenatum can cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP). Mussels, oysters and scallops from areas affected by G. catenatum blooms have been highly contaminated with paralytic shellfish toxins, resulting in human poisonings (NIMPIS, 2002c).
 
Source: Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) 2015. Species profile Gymnodinium catenatum. Available from: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=645 [Accessed 09 September 2019]
file icon Gracilaria vermiculophyllahot!Tooltip 09/12/2019 Hits: 253
SYSTEM
Marine
 
DESCRIPTION
Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a red macroalga that is cartilaginous, cylindrical and up to 50 cm long. It is coarsely branched, often profusely so. G. vermiculophylla can be found as loose-lying thalli or attached to small stones or shells. Red algae are often found in the vegetative state, and characterisation of reproductive structures is often necessary for correct identification of Gracilaria species (AlgaeBase 2010; Liao & Hommersand 2003; Nyberg et al. 2009; Rueness 2005).
 
NATIVE RANGE
ASEAN: Viet Nam
World: China, Japan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation
 
KNOWN INTRODUCED RANGE
ASEAN:
World: Atlantic-Northeast, Canada, Europe, Germany, Mexico, Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Atlantic-Northwest, Denmark, France, Italy, Morocco, Pacific-Northeast, Spain, United States
 
PATHWAY
Transport – Ship/boat ballast water Fisheries
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Spread is likely to occur on vectors such as fishing and leisure boats (Nyberg 2007 in Nyberg et al. 2009).Fishing gear (Nyberg et al. 2009).
 
IMPACTS
Gracilaria vermiculophylla inhibits the growth and survival of native algae through competition (Council of Europe 2009; Hamman et al. n.d.). G. vermiculophylla is reported to be a problem in fishing industries through fouling of nets (Freshwater et al. 2000).
 
Source: Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) 2015. Species profile Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Available from: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1698 [Accessed 09 September 2019]
 
 
 
file icon Bugula neritinahot!Tooltip 09/12/2019 Hits: 209
SYSTEM
Marine
 
COMMON NAMES
English: bryozoan, common bugula, brown bryozoan
 
DESCRIPTION
Bugula neritina forms flexible bushy colonies, branching biserial, to about 10cm high and is purplish-brown in colour. Zooids white and globular, with the outer corner pointed (Bishop Museum 2002, in Gordon and Mawatari, 1992). Zooids are large and measure an average of 0.97 X 0.28mm. B. neritina differs from other species in this genus in that it possesses no avicularia and no spines. The lophophore measures an average of 0.764mm in diameter and bears 23 tentacles (SMSFP 2001). Embryos brooded in ovicells are dark brown in colour and measure approximately 0.25mm in diameter (SMSFP 2001 in Winston 1982).
 
KNOWN INTRODUCED RANGE
ASEAN: Philippines
WORLD: Argentina, Australia, Bermuda, Chile, Ecuador, France, India, Italy, Korea Democratic People’s Republic of, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom, Atlantic-Western Central, Belgium, Brazil, China, Egypt, Germany, Israel, Japan, Korea Republic of, Mediterranean and Black Sea, Netherlands, Panama, Puerto Rico, Turkey, United States
 
PATHWAY
Transport – Ship/boat ballast water; Ship/boat hull fouling
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Bugula neritina attaches to oyster shells and be transferred along with oyster shippings (Cohen 2005). Bugula neritina can be transported via tiny colonies attached to the sides of ballast tanks or on floating material inside the ballast tanks (Cohen 2005). Ship/boat hull fouling is a common means of movement of Bugula neritina colonies and a likely source of ongoing introductions.
 
IMPACTS
Bryozoans are one of the main organisms to encrust and foul ships, piers, buoys and other man-made marine surfaces and structures (VMNH 2005).
 
Source: Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) 2015. Species profile Bugula neritina. Available from: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1080 [Accessed 09 September 2019]
file icon Alexandrium minutumhot!Tooltip 09/12/2019 Hits: 240
SYSTEM
Marine
 
COMMON NAMES
English: red tide phytoplankton, red tide dinoflagellate
 
DESCRIPTION
Alexandrium minutum is a toxic single-celled armoured dinoflagellate that is well characterized morphologically in Balech, 1995. Cells are spherical in shape and small-sized, 15 to 29 um in diameter. The cell is green-brown in colour with a theca (clear protective covering). Small details on this theca differentiate A.minutum from other Alexandrium species. Cysts of A. minutum are from spherical to slightly flattened in shape and from circular (25–35 um diameter) when seen from above to oval (28–35 um long, 20–30 um wide) in lateral view. The most common cell content is granular material and a more or less condensed yellow–orange accumulation body. Nevertheless, globular content is also observed in some cysts (Bravo et al., 2006).
 
KNOWN INTRODUCED RANGE
ASEAN: Malaysia
WORLD: Atlantic – Northeast, Denmark, Ireland, Mediterranean and Black Sea, Portugal, Sweden, Turkey, United States, Australia, Egypt, New Zealnd, Spain, Taiwan, United Kingdom
 
PATHWAY
Transport – Ship/boat Ballast Water
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
The red-tide dinoflagellate may be accidentally transferred with ballast water (Hallegraeff and Bolch 1992, NIMPIS, 2002).
 
IMPACTS
Alexandrium minutum produces toxins which are toxic to some zooplankton and fish and can reduce copepod reproduction. The toxins are bioaccumulated in zooplankton, shellfish and crabs, the consumption of which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans and other mammals.
 
Source: Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) 2015. Species profile Alexandrium minutum. Available from: http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1023 [Accessed 09 September 2019]
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