Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheets

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]
file icon Swietenia macrophyllahot!Tooltip 09/27/2016 Hits: 1005
MAHOGANY FAMILY
Meliaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: big-leaved mahogany, broad-leaved mahogany, Honduras mahogany
Cambodia: kroab baek
Indonesia: mahoni
Malaysia: cheria mahogany
Thailand: mahokkani-bailek
Viet Nam: cây nhac ngua
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen tropical tree species (up to 40–60 m high), trunk is straight, cylindrical, 3–4 m in circumference, buttresses up to 5 m high, crown of young trees is narrow, but old trees have a broad, dense and highly branched crown.
Bark: Brownish-grey to reddish-brown, deeply furrowed, scaly, inner bark red-brown or pinkish red, flaking off in small patches.
Leaves: Green, once-divided [12–45 (–60) cm long], 3–6 pairs of sword- or egg-shaped leaflets (5–12 cm long and 2–5 cm wide), margins entire gradually tapering to a sharp point.
Flowers: Small (0.5–1 cm long and 8 mm across), in clusters (10–20 cm long).
Fruits: Capsule (a dry fruit that opens at maturity), light grey to brown, egg-shaped (12–39 cm long and 7–12 cm wide) containing 20–70 winged seeds (7–12 cm long and 2–2.5 cm wide).
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru and Venezuela.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, building materials, timber, shade and ornament.
 
INVADES
Disturbed land, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
Mahogany readily invades secondary forests and forest edges and gaps preventing native species regeneration. In the lowlands of Mount Makiling, Philippines, mahogany had penetrated 250 m into secondary forests in 70 years (Baguinon, 2011). Dominance is facilitated by the fact that mahogany may also be allelopathic (Thinley, 2002). Extracts from the leaves of mahogany were shown to retard the growth of narra (Pterocarpus indicus Willd.) seedlings in the Philippines (Baguinon et al., 2003). Diversity of native plants in general was also considerably reduced under or near S. macrophylla stands. Invasive mahogany species together with other introduced plants are preventing the regeneration of dipterocarp and nondipterocarp forests in parts of Asia.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018

 

file icon Stachytarpheta jamaicensishot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 416
VERBENA FAMILY
Verbenaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: blue porter weed, blue snake weed, Brazilian tea, Jamaica snakeweed, porterweed, snake weed
Indonesia: gewongan, jarong
Malaysia: ramput tahi babi, selaseh dandi
Philippines: albaka, bilu-bilu, bolomaros, kandi-kandilaan, limbagat, sentemiento, verbena de las antilles
Viet Nam: cây duôi chuot, hai tiên
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen shrubby herb (60–120 cm high), young stems green or purplish, mostly hairless and square in cross-section becoming rounded, light brown and woody as they mature; woody rootstock.
Leaves: Green with a bluish or greyish tinge, leathery, hairless or with a few hairs on veins on undersides, simple, leaves eggshaped, oval or somewhat elongated with almost parallel sides (2–12 cm long and 1–5 cm wide) with rounded tips, margins sharp but finely toothed; leaves held opposite each other on stems on stalks 5–35 mm long.
Flowers: Light blue, blue or mauve, tubular (7–11 mm long and 8 mm across) on long, curved and thick spikes (15–50 cm long and 3–7 mm thick) at the end of branches.
Fruits: Capsules (dry fruits that open at maturity), green turning dark brown, dark purple or black as they mature, small, somewhat elongated with almost parallel sides (3–7 mm longand 1.5–2 mm across).
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname, south-eastern USA, Venezuela, and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed sites, wastelands, fallow land, plantations, managed pasture, gardens, drainage ditches, savannah, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps, lowlands, floodplains and coastal environs.
 
IMPACTS
Forms dense stands outcompeting native plants for water and nutrients. Probable host of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus in India (Mathew and Balakrishnan, 1991).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Sphagneticola trilobatahot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 349
DAISY FAMILY
Asteraceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: creeping oxeye, creeping daisy, creeping wedelia, Singapore daisy
Indonesia: seruni, widelia, wedelia
Malaysia: panchut-panchut
Philippines: imelda
Viet Nam: son cúc ba thùy
 
DESCRIPTION
Creeping, mat-forming evergreen herb with scrambling or climbing habit [15–30 (–70) cm tall]; stems green or reddish (up to 2 m long), slightly hairy, rounded, rooting at the joints.
Leaves: Dark green, glossy, almost hairless, simple, fleshy (40–180 mm long and 15–80 mm wide), three-lobed, margins toothed, held in opposite pairs on stem, stalkless or on short stalks.
Flowers: Bright yellow to orange, daisy-like (20–35 mm across), borne singly on upright stalks (3–15 cm long).
Fruits: Achene (small, dry, one-seeded fruit that does not open at maturity), brown, elongate (4–5 mm long).
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine, erosion control and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed areas, wasteland, drainage ditches, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps and lowlands.
 
IMPACTS
Forms a dense ground cover to the detriment of other plant species. It is also allelopathic enhancing its competitiveness (Zhang et al., 2004). Even low infestation levels have a negative impact on plant diversity. In a study on Hainan Island, China, S. trilobata already starts decreasing plant community diversity at 10% cover (Qi et al., 2014). In south-east Viti Levu and Taveuni Island, Fiji, it has invaded taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott; Araceae] fields (Macanawai, 2013).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Spathodea campanulatahot!Tooltip 09/27/2016 Hits: 847
JACARANDA FAMILY
Bignoniaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: fireball, flame tree, fountain tree, Nandi flame, Nile flame, tulip tree
Cambodia: angkie dei chmool
Indonesia: pohon hujan
Viet Nam: cây hoa tuylip châu phi
 
DESCRIPTION
Large, upright tree [10–15 (–35) m tall] with trunk up to 170 cm in diameter with a dense wide crown; younger branches are almost hairless or have a sparse covering of short hairs, older branches thick with small white-coloured corky spots; shoots, buds and branchlets covered in yellow-brown hairs, slightly buttressed; sheds leaves at the end of the growing season.
Bark: Pale, grey-brown, smooth, rough with age.
Leaves: Green, yellow-brown soft hairs on underside, large, oncedivided (50 cm long) with (7–) 11–15 (–17) broadly oval or eggshaped leaflets with base rounded and gradually tapering towards the end (15 cm long and 7.5 cm wide), margins entire, 2–3 glands at base of each leaflet, leaves oppositely arranged on stalks that are up to 6 cm long.
Flowers: Orange, showy, tulip-shaped, in dense clusters (8–10 cm long) on long stalks (10 cm long) at the end of branches, individual flower stalks short and covered in brownish hairs; there is a yellow-flowering variety.
Fruits: Pod-like (several-seeded dry fruit that splits open at maturity), green changing to brown as they mature, elongated (17–30 cm long and 3.5–5 cm wide).
 
ORIGIN
Angola, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo,Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Gabon, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Togo.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, carving, medicine, bee forage, erosion control, mulch, windbreak, shade and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed land, forest edges/gaps and riparian areas.
 
IMPACTS
Native plants are displaced by the shading effect of the large leaves, resulting in reduced biodiversity under tree canopies (Weber, 2003). In surveys in Fiji, respondents claimed that the African tulip tree competes with crops, reduces the amount of land available for grazing livestock and leads to the loss of more desirable trees that are used for medicinal purposes and/or firewood (Brown and Daigneault, 2014). It is a weed of coffee plantations in Cuba, reducing yields (Herrera-Isla et al., 2002).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Solanum viarumhot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 254
TOMATO FAMILY
Solanaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: tropical soda apple
Viet Nam: cà trái vàng
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen, erect herb [50–150 (–200) cm tall], with densely hairy stems and branches with recurved (2–5 mm long) and straight spines (up to 20 mm long) on the leaf stalks and the leaf veins.
Leaves: Dark green, glossy above, duller below, hairy, simple, broadly egg-shaped [6–20 cm long and 6–15 cm wide], bluntly lobed, with spines on the veins and hairs on both sides, leaf stalks are 3–7 cm long with prickles. Flowers: White (1.5 cm across), in clusters of 1–5.
Fruits: Berries (fleshy fruits that don’t open at maturity), mottled light and dark green becoming pale yellow as they mature, smooth (2–3 cm across), containing 400 brown seeds (2–3 mm in diameter).
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, southern Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and accidentally as a contaminant.
 
INVADES
Grassland, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
Dense stands displace other plant species by crowding or shading them out. The prickles on the plants reduce wildlife forage and prevent movement of animals through invaded areas (USDA-FS, 2005). The foliage and stems are unpalatable to cattle, considerably reducing livestock-carrying capacities (Medal et al., 2012). Control costs of S. viarum to ranchers in Florida were estimated at US$ 6.5–16 million per year (Thomas, 2007). It has also caused poisoning of goats in Florida (Porter et al., 2003). It is an alternative host for many plant diseases including the cucumber mosaic virus, gemini virus, potato leafroll virus, potato virus Y, tobacco etch virus, tomato mosaic virus, tomato mottle virus and the fungal pathogen, Alternaria solani (Cooke, 1997). It is also a host for a number of insect pests (Sudbrink et al., 2000; Medal et al., 2012).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Page 2 of 13