Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheets

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file icon Acacia decurrenshot!Tooltip 10/09/2018 Hits: 460
PEA FAMILY
Fabaceae; Subfamily: Mimosaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: acacia bark, early black wattle, green wattle, Sydney wattle, tan wattle
Indonesia: wartel
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen tree with no thorns/spines [5–10 (–15) m tall]; no visible hairs; branches prominently angled with wings or ridges that emanate from the leaf bases.
Bark: Olive-green turning grey, smooth to deeply fissured.
Leaves: Bright green, twice-divided, feathery; leaflets slender (6–15 mm long), a single raised gland occurs at the junction of each pair of leaf branchlets.
Flowers: Bright yellow, rounded clusters arranged into larger, showy, elongated compound clusters.
Fruits: Pods (several-seeded dry fruits that split open at maturity), green turning dark brown as they mature, elongated, hairless, slightly flattened (2–10 cm long), containing about 11 black seeds.
 
ORIGIN
Southeast Australia
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, building materials, timber, tannins, pulp, soil conservation, windbreaks, shelter, shade and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed land, wasteland, urban open space, grasslands, savannah, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
The accumulation of dead/rotting foliage forms a thick ground cover which, over time, eliminates the growth and establishment of other vegetation (Ruskin, 1983). When it forms dense thickets along waterways it reduces water flow and can contribute to flooding (Hill et al., 2000) and streambank erosion. It has a significant impact on water runoff, and because it fixes nitrogen, it alters soil nutrient cycling. Its pollen is reported to be allergenic.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 9 October 2018
file icon Solanum viarumhot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 455
TOMATO FAMILY
Solanaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: tropical soda apple
Viet Nam: cà trái vàng
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen, erect herb [50–150 (–200) cm tall], with densely hairy stems and branches with recurved (2–5 mm long) and straight spines (up to 20 mm long) on the leaf stalks and the leaf veins.
Leaves: Dark green, glossy above, duller below, hairy, simple, broadly egg-shaped [6–20 cm long and 6–15 cm wide], bluntly lobed, with spines on the veins and hairs on both sides, leaf stalks are 3–7 cm long with prickles. Flowers: White (1.5 cm across), in clusters of 1–5.
Fruits: Berries (fleshy fruits that don’t open at maturity), mottled light and dark green becoming pale yellow as they mature, smooth (2–3 cm across), containing 400 brown seeds (2–3 mm in diameter).
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, southern Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and accidentally as a contaminant.
 
INVADES
Grassland, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
Dense stands displace other plant species by crowding or shading them out. The prickles on the plants reduce wildlife forage and prevent movement of animals through invaded areas (USDA-FS, 2005). The foliage and stems are unpalatable to cattle, considerably reducing livestock-carrying capacities (Medal et al., 2012). Control costs of S. viarum to ranchers in Florida were estimated at US$ 6.5–16 million per year (Thomas, 2007). It has also caused poisoning of goats in Florida (Porter et al., 2003). It is an alternative host for many plant diseases including the cucumber mosaic virus, gemini virus, potato leafroll virus, potato virus Y, tobacco etch virus, tomato mosaic virus, tomato mottle virus and the fungal pathogen, Alternaria solani (Cooke, 1997). It is also a host for a number of insect pests (Sudbrink et al., 2000; Medal et al., 2012).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Leucaena leucocephalahot!Tooltip 10/22/2018 Hits: 454
PEA FAMILY
Fabaceae; Sub-family: Mimosaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: jumbie bean, lead tree, leucaena, wild tamarind
Cambodia: khtum tehs, krathum thet
Indonesia: petai cina
Lao PDR: kathin;kh’oonz, koong khaaw
Malaysia: lamtoro, petai belalang
Philippines: bayani, komkompitis, loyloy, palomaria
Thailand: kra thin, to-bao
Viet Nam: cây keo dau
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen thornless shrub or small tree [2–10 (15) m high]; young stems green and densely covered in greyish-coloured hairs.
Bark: Smooth, greyish-brown with numerous small raised spots.
Leaves: Dark green, twice-divided [0.7–15 (–35) cm long] with small raised structure (gland) usually on leaf stalk, 3–10 pairs of leaf branchlets, each 2–10 cm long and each bearing 5–22 pairs of leaflets that are somewhat elongated, almost parallel sided or swordshaped (7–21 mm long and 1.5–5 mm wide).
Flowers: White or pale yellow in globular clusters (12–30 mm across), borne singly or in groups of 2–3 located at the juncture of the leaf and stem.
Fruits: Pods (several-seeded dry fruits that split open at maturity), green turning brown or reddish brown as they mature, elongated, almost straight (8–18 cm long and 2 cm wide), flattened but raised over the seeds, pointed tips; containing 10–25 hard seeds.
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Guatemala and Mexico.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, fodder, tannins, nitrogen fixation, soil conservation, shade and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed land, urban open space, drainage ditches, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps, riparian vegetation, lowlands and coastal shrub.
 
IMPACTS
Forms large monocultures displacing native plant and animal species. In Hawaii, it is outcompeting open forest species (Cronk and Fuller, 1995), while on the Brazilian island of Fernando de Noronha, it impacts endemic flora. The invasion of leucaena has had a severe effect on the native plant community in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, and may alter secondary succession, promoting the invasion and establishment of more aggressive alien plant species (Yoshida and Oka, 2004). In Guam, leucaena is preventing the establishment of indigenous species (B. Lawrence, pers. comm., in Walton, 2003). In Vanuatu, it can form dense monospecific thickets, threatening native plant species and is ‘very difficult to eradicate once established, rendering extensive areas unusable and inaccessible’ (Bakeo and Qarani, 2005). In the Erap Valley of Papua New Guinea, it forms monospecific stands in river valleys, replacing native riparian vegetation (G. Werren, pers. comm., in Walton, 2003).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 23 October 2018
file icon Ruellia tuberosahot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 454
ACANTHUS FAMILY
Acanthaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: bluebell, iron root, large bell-flower, minnieroot, popping pod, ruellia, sheep potato, spearpod
Cambodia: phka arch kok, phka smau, smau leach phtoush
Indonesia: pletekan
Viet Nam: cây Qua no
 
DESCRIPTION
Biennial (lives for 1–2 years) herb, creeping or upright [60 (–70) cm tall], stems four-sided and hairy, swollen and purplish at the nodes with thick, elongated spindle-shaped tuberous roots. Leaves: Green, glossy, almost hairless, simple, oval to eggshaped [5–9 (–18) cm long and 2–4 (–9) cm wide], margins entire, leaf stalk is 5–7 mm long.
Flowers: Mauve to blue-violet, solitary, tubular (5–5.5 cm long and 3.5 cm across), showy.
Fruits: Capsule, hairless, elongated with almost parallel sides (2.2–3 cm long), containing 24–28 seeds.
 
ORIGIN
Colombia, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, railway lines, disturbed land, drainage ditches and lowlands.
 
IMPACTS
Forms dense stands displacing native plants and the organisms associated with them.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Acacia mangiumhot!Tooltip 10/09/2018 Hits: 451
PEA FAMILY
Fabaceae; Subfamily: Mimosaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: brown salwood, hickory wattle, mangium
Cambodia: acacia sleuk thom
Indonesia: mangge hutan, nak, sabah salwood, tongke hutan
Philippines: maber
Thailand: krathinthepha
Viet Nam: keo tai tuong
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen tree with no thorns/spines (30–35 m tall) and often with a straight trunk [25–50 (–90) cm in diameter].
Bark: Greenish and smooth in young trees; rough, greyish brown to dark brown, hard, fissured near the base of older trees.
Leaves: Dark green, ‘leaves’ are expanded leaf stalks called phyllodes, straight on one side and slightly curved on the other (25 cm long and 3.5–10 cm wide), 4–5 main longitudinal veins, gland conspicuous at the base of the phyllodes.
Flowers: Numerous tiny white or cream flowers in loose spikes (5–12 cm long).
Fruits: Pods (several-seeded dry fruits that split open at maturity), green turning brown as they mature (8–10 cm long and 0.3–0.5 cm wide), initially straight and broad but irregularly coiled when ripe; seeds are black and shiny (3–5 mm long and 2–3 mm wide), attached to the pods by an orange-to-red folded appendage.
 
ORIGIN
Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, building materials, timber, fibre, tannins, shade, shelter and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed areas, wastelands, urban open space, plantations, croplands, forest edges/gaps, woodland edges/gaps and coastal areas.
 
IMPACTS
In forests in Brunei A. mangium has displaced many native plants and, in particular, heath forest species (Osunkoya et al., 2005). The tree has also invaded fruit and coffee farms and has a negative impact on the germination and growth of two local rice varieties (Ismail and Metali, 2014). It also uses significant amounts of water, more that the natural vegetation that it replaces. By fixing nitrogen it also impacts on soil nutrient cycling.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 9 October 2018
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