Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheets

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file icon Acacia auriculiformishot!Tooltip 10/08/2018 Hits: 356
PEA FAMILY
Fabaceae; Subfamily: Mimosaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: earleaf acacia, Japanese acacia, northern black wattle, tan wattle
Cambodia: acacia sleuk toch, smach tehs
Indonesia: akasia kuning, pohon akasia
Malaysia: akasia kuning, bunga siam, kasia
Philippines: auri
Thailand: kratin-narong
Viet Nam: keo lá tram, tràm bông vàng
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen tree with no thorns/spines [8–20 (–35) m tall], trunk 60 cm in diameter, often multi-stemmed with compact spread.
Bark: Grey or brown, sometimes black at the base, smooth in young trees, becoming rough and longitudinally fissured with age. 
Leaves: Greyish-green, ‘leaves’ are flattened leaf stalks called phyllodes, slightly curved (8–20 cm long and 1.0–4.5 cm wide), hairless and thinly textured; 3–7 longitudinal veins running together towards the lower  margin or in the middle near the base, with many fine, crowded secondary veins, and a distinct gland at the base of the phyllodes.
Flowers: Light golden-orange, minute, in spikes (8.5 cm long), fragrant.
Fruits: Pods (several-seeded dry fruits that split open at maturity), green turning brown as they mature, initially straight or curved becoming twisted and coiled (6.5 cm long and 1.5 cm wide) containing shiny black seeds (0.4–0.6 cm long and 0.3–0.4 cm wide) encircled by a long red, yellow or orange structure.
 
ORIGIN
Australia and Papua New Guinea.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Fuelwood, building materials, timber, pulp, erosion control, land reclamation, shade and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed areas, wastelands, urban open space, forest edges/gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
Displaces native vegetation and shades out indigenous plant species. In Florida, USA, it threatens rare plant species such as the listed scrub pinweed, Lechea cernua Sm. (Cistaceae), in remnant scrub areas (K. C. Burks, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, pers. obs., in FLEPPC, 2015). In Singapore, it is very persistent in disturbed and secondary forests (Tan, 2011). It is also considered to be allelopathic, inhibiting the germination and growth of agricultural crops tested (Hoque et al., 2003).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 9 October 2018
file icon Canna indicahot!Tooltip 10/08/2018 Hits: 357
CANNA FAMILY
Cannaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: African arrowroot, canna lily, edible canna, Indian shot, purple arrowroot
Cambodia: chek tehs
Indonesia: bunga kana, buah tasbeh, ganyong, ubi pikul
Lao PDR: kwàyz ké, kwàyz ph’uttha son
Malaysia: daun tasbeh, ganjong, pisang sebiak, pisang sebiak
Myanmar: adalut, butsarana
Philippines: batag-batag, balunsaying, korintas sa kalasan, kakuwintasan, tikas-tikas
Thailand:, bua lawong, phut, phuttaa-raksaa, phutthason, tharaksa
Viet Nam: chuoi hoa, ngai hoa
 
DESCRIPTION
Robust evergreen herb (1–2 m high) with a thick, branching, underground rhizome; leaves taper into slender petioles that form a sheath (tubular structure that clasps stem) around the main stem.
Leaves: Green, hairless, simple, elongated or oval (20–60 cm long and 10–30 cm wide), tapering to a point, margins entire, sheath clasping the stem similar to Canna × generalis Bailey, which also has purple-bronze leaves.
Flowers: Red or orange, usually yellow below, narrow (40–50 mm long), borne singly or in pairs at the tips of the flowering stems as opposed to Canna × generalis, which are yellow, red, orange, white or other colours, broad (80–90 mm long).
Fruits: Capsules (dry fruits that open at maturity), green turning brown as they mature, spiny, three-valved containing hard black seeds.
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Ornament
 
INVADES
Gardens, plantations, forest edges/gaps, drainage ditches, irrigation channels, dam/lake/river edges, ponds, lowlands, floodplains, swamps and wetlands.
 
IMPACTS
Forms dense clumps out-competing native plant species. It also restricts the flow of water contributing to increased sedimentation and flooding. Dense stands can also restrict access to water. It is also an alternative
host of a number of crop pests, including banana bunchy top virus, cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, and a range of other pests that cause pathogenic diseases. Chemical extracts have a negative impact on snail species (Tripathi and Singh, 2000).
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 8 October 2018
file icon Thunbergia grandiflorahot!Tooltip 10/04/2018 Hits: 361
ACANTHUS FAMILY
Acanthaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: Bengal trumpet vine, blue thunbergia, blue trumpet vine, Indian sky flower
Cambodia: voer thnort
Indonesia: keladi-keladian
Philippines: ag-agob, hagonoy, suga-suga, padawel, saromayag, kama-elaw
Viet Nam: dây bông xanh, bông báo
 
DESCRIPTION
A vigorous evergreen climber with rope-like stems (up to 15 m in height) with tuberous roots; young stems are green, hairy, square in cross-section, becoming brown and more rounded with age.
Leaves: Dark green, somewhat hairy, simple, variable in shape from triangular with broad heart-shaped bases to egg-shaped with broad end at base (8–22 cm long and 3–15 cm wide), margins entire to irregularly toothed or with irregular pointed lobes, held opposite each other on stems.
Flowers: Pale-blue, violet or mauve with pale yellow or whitish throat, trumpet-shaped (3–8 cm long and 6–8 cm across), on elongated clusters; each flower on a stalk (4.5 cm long).
Fruits: Capsule (dry fruit that opens at maturity) with a rounded base (18 mm long and 13 mm wide) and a long tapered beak (2–5 cm long and about 7 mm wide).
 
ORIGIN
Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar and Nepal.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Ornament
 
INVADES
Plantations, forest, forest edges/gaps, woodlands, woodland edges/ gaps and riparian vegetation.
 
IMPACTS
This climber completely smothers other established plant species and prevents the regeneration of native species in invaded areas (Starr et al., 2003b). T. grandiflora has a heavy and extensive tuberous root system which can lead to riverbank destabilization and damage fences and building foundations (Motooka et al., 2003). In Queensland, Australia, it is having a negative impact on threatened lowland tropical rainforest that have been fragmented by agricultural and urban development (Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, 2007). It also climbs on to power lines causing power outages.
 

Source:

Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 5 October 2018

file icon Piper aduncumhot!Tooltip 10/23/2018 Hits: 367
PEPPER FAMILY
Piperaceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: bamboo piper, false matico, jointwood, piper
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen shrub or small tree (6–8 m tall), with short stilt roots, often in thickets, branches are erect, but with drooping twigs and swollen, purplish nodes, foliage and twigs aromatic. Bark: Yellow-green, finely hairy stems and enlarged, ringed nodes.
Leaves: Green, softly hairy beneath, broadly sword- to oval-shaped (13–25 cm long and 3.5–8 cm wide), tapering into long tips with the base asymmetric, short leaf stalks.
Flowers: Yellowish, tiny, in long curving spikes opposite the leaves.
Fruits: Berries (fleshy fruits that don’t open at maturity), green, small, egg-shaped, compressed into greyish, worm-like spikes.
 
ORIGIN
Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela, and the Caribbean.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Medicine, spice and ornament.
 
INVADES
Roadsides, disturbed land, fallow land, plantations, forest edges/gaps, lowlands and riparian zones.
 
IMPACTS
P. aduncum establishes dense stands which shade out native species and prevent forest regeneration. In field surveys in Papua New Guinea, it was found to be present in all garden plots, 92% of riverine plots, 80% of young secondary and 65% of old secondary forest plots, and 75% of the gaps (Leps et al., 2002). In regenerating areas, P. aduncum sometimes attained a canopy cover of 75% and suppressed the native species which local communities utilized extensively in the past (Leps et al., 2002). In the Pacific, it is accidentally harvested with kava (Piper methysticum G. Forst), an important crop, lowering its quality. It also competes with kava and other crops and may act as a host for kava pests and pathogensm (Plant Protection Service, 2001). It consumes large quantities of water, drying out the soil, and absorbs significant amounts of nutrients to the detriment of crops.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 24 October 2018
file icon Austroeupatorium inulifoliumhot!Tooltip 10/09/2018 Hits: 369
DAISY FAMILY
Asteraceae
 
COMMON NAMES
English: austroeupatorium
Indonesia: kirinyuh, babanjaran
 
DESCRIPTION
Evergreen spreading, scrambling shrub [1–2.8 (–5) m tall]; stems covered with dense short hairs.
Leaves: Dark green above, pale green and covered with short fine hairs below; spear-shaped (7–18 cm long and 2.5–8 cm wide), leaves held opposite each other on stem on wedge-shaped leaf stalks (0.5–3 cm long).
Flowers: White in terminal, cylindrical heads (5–6 mm long and 2–3 mm wide), 8–15 flowers in each head, fragrant.
Fruits: Achenes (small, dry, one-seeded fruits that don’t open at maturity) brown, somewhat elongated with almost parallel sides, angular (1.5 mm long), with a whitish ring of hairs (pappus) (4 mm long) on the top of the fruit.
 
ORIGIN
Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.
 
REASON FOR INTRODUCTION
Ornament
 
INVADES
Roadsides, wastelands, disturbed areas, wastelands, urban open space, perennial crops, plantations, forest edges/gaps, grasslands, savannah, riparian zones and wetlands.
 
IMPACTS
Displaces native plant species and invades areas planted with perennial crops reducing yields and increasing management costs. In the Philippines, it forms dense thickets in rubber, tea and rosella plantations, upland rice plantations and in clearings of secondary forests (Waterhouse and Mitchell, 1998). In Sri Lanka, A. inulifolium has spread into the Knuckles Conservation Area, and has invaded many ecosystems such as grasslands, plantations and roadsides. It is unpalatable to livestock and reduces livestock-carrying capacities.
 
Source:
Witt, Arne. 2017. Guide to the Naturalized and Invasive Plants of Southeast Asia. CAB International. Retrieved from http://www.cabi.org/cabebooks/ebook/20173158961 on 10 October 2018
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